How to be a Social Media Content Curating Ninja

Part 2 of a 2 Part Series

(Read Part 1 here)

If you read Part 1 of this series, you know WHO you’re creating content for and WHAT she might find relevant.  Next, let’s look for sources to inspire you… get the creative juices flowing.

 

Media: What’s trending in the news oftentimes makes interesting (and timely!) content. Piggyback onto trends and ride the viral wave as your readers share this “hot topic” with their friends. Just remember to keep it relevant. For instance, a recent news story reported that Kim Kardashian’s boyfriend du jour forbid her to get Botox.  So, if you are a cosmetic practice who offers Botox to your patients – this might set up a great topic for discussion. And if it gets a little heated, that’s okay. You can remind everyone to keep it civil if need be. And remember to encourage the discussion by posting replies to each person who comments with @ tags. (If you don’t have a clue what we mean by @ tags, click here for a über-fab article from my dear friend, mentor, and relationship marketing expert, Mari Smith).

Blogs & eNewsletters: Subscribe to lots and lots of blogs and eblasts. You can get great ideas from topics posted by WebMD, EverydayHealth, KevinMD (aka “Social Media’s Leading Physician”), and many others. Read what they have to say and you’re very likely to have at least one light bulb go off. Then take that topic and tweak it to suit your audience (remember the importance of relevance). You can also get great ideas from your society newsletters (ASPS, ASAPS, AACS, AAD, NSOCP, etc). Plus don’t forget about your consumer-facing publication(s) and websites – such as RealSelf and ProjectBeauty.

Google Alerts: If you don’t know what a Google Alert is click here. You might already have some alerts set up with your practice name, physician name, etc., but do you have alerts on topics such as breast augmentation news, Botox, celebrity plastic surgery, etc.? The possibilities are endless (really!) and you can choose the alerts to come to you as they happen or once per day, week, etc.

Use the Twitter Search Function

Twitter # Search: One of the coolest ninja tricks on Twitter is the search feature. You can search on any key word you want (ex: #CosmeticSurgery) and see what’s being discussed in real time! You can jump into the conversation and/or look for great content ideas. Some of the coolest content I’ve found was from using this method. Warning: If you have A.D.D., this might not be the most effective use of your time. It’s really easy to get sidetracked and forget why you came in the first place!

Fashion & Beauty Magazines: Oh my goodness… is there ever a plethora of information here! I have to admit, I got a little carried away recently and subscribed to a bunch of great magazines (and just might need a bigger Post Office Box). BUT, I have gotten my money’s worth already!  Here are a few I subscribe to:

  • Allure
  • Fitness
  • Self
  • Lucky
  • Better Homes & Gardens
  • W
  • InStyle

Google + Search: Just like Twitter, you can use the full power of Google’s search in a much more fun and social environment, Google+. You can search topics and get a whole host of terrific (and trending) info from the web. Think of it like a news feed of posts just on the topic you are interested in. It’s the best – try it out and let us know what you think!

Follow Heavy Hitters (like us!): Just kidding… (well, sort of). We’re just making sure you are still paying attention! But seriously, think of big influences in your specialty and see what they are doing to get ideas.

Books: Stop by your local book store and browse the health, beauty, medical, and humor sections. Here are just a few of my favorite books to draw inspiration from for posts and tweets (click on them to learn more):

IMPORTANT NOTE:  This should go without saying, but we’ve had it done to us plenty, so we’re saying it anyway. “Do not plagiarize (steal) someone else’s content. They worked hard to create it – so give a “hat tip”, denoted by this symbol: to those who gave you the idea  or inspiration (such as  Courtney Romagnoli). Or, if you are introducing a topic and linking or sharing the bulk of the article with little modification, put this symbol to say “via”:  (such as Monique Ramsey”). Read more about using these symbols and the correct ways to attribute content on the Curator’s Code website.

We hope this gives you some inspiration on how to find amazing and relevant content. Do you have other ways you find inspiration for your posts? Share them with us in the comments below!

~ Monique